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20120929
20121007
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
a lot of hot button issues. >> yeah. the most recently retired justices were john paul stevens went out at 90. david souter 69, sandra day o'connor 75. is there a tradition of when justices usually retire, be it age, or time served? >> well, they're like most human beings. a lot of factors weigh in. there is -- there was a tradition where justices would tend to retire during the term of a president that was at the same party that appointed them. but we know neither justices souter nor stevens did that. they were both republican employees and went out during president obama's term. life circumstances can drive retirement decisions. so it's really not scientifically predictable or politically predictable. >> do you see any most likely candidates if another seat opens up under president obama? >> you know, i think if president obama, first of all, justice ruth bader ginsburg i think the pressure to replace her with another woman appointee would be enormous. we've made progress in getting a third of the court female and i don't think president obama or any president would want to go backwar
that killed our ambassador, chris stevens and others on the ground. on september 16th, the u.n. ambassador for this administration came on this program and this is how she described whether or not this was a deliberate act, a terrorist attack. this is what sizen wright said at that time. >> let me tell you best information we have at present. first of all, there's an fbi investigation which is ongoing and we look to that investigation to give us the definitive word as to what transpired. but putting together the best information that we have available to us today, our current assessment is that what happened in benghazi was in fact initially a spontaneous reaction to what had just transpired hours before in cairo. almost a copycat of the demonstrations against our facility in cairo. which were prompted of course by the video. >> there's a caveat there, she said the fbi was still investigating. but the thought was it was a spontaneous reaction. a couple of days before that the libyan president said al qaeda was behind the attack. and days later, the president's spokesman, jay carney says th
is a millennial, steven crowder, what is millennial first of all. >> i was using my phone and people my age, probably about early mid 20's, and the general age range, and first range, late 80's, through early 2000's, depends who you ask. >> clayton: we have a new gallup poll out, this is interesting on millenials and how they'll fall in line perhaps for prol, president obama. and for president obama 58% and you framed it this way, that they are selfish and that's why they're going to vote for president obama. why is that? >> sure, most people are selfish, not singling out millennials. we tend to vote in our self-interest and tend to vote the occupy movement for more free crap not based on the constitutional parameters of government, but found principles, but what the government can give them and because they're voting that way, they're doing it wrong. >> clayton: so health care, number one, a lot of people saying in that age range of 26 years old now on their parents' health care plan because of obama care, you think that could be a big factor? >> and the way to buy someone's vote in the s
. the evolution of what might be the truth of what happened regarding the killing of ambassador chris stevens and three others at the consulate there in libya. now the director of national intelligence is weighing in. is he giving cover to susan rice for the administration's wobbling evolution on the truth? >> we may see how this argument is now about to play out. right? we had a debate on the show a little while ago. fascinating because i was hearing from mark lavine, radio talk show host. argument from the left that this intelligence may have been muddled from the beginning and they were making their way to uncover it this is what the director of national intelligence is now saying it was on us, basically, not the white house. read. this in the intermeet adaftermath there was information that led us to assess that the attack began response stainously following protests earlier that day at our embassy in cairo. we provided that assessment to the white house and men's of congress who used that information to discuss that attack publicly and provide updates as they became available. through th
in a region where it's been very volatile. these are bureaucratic decisions. and ambassador stevens made the decision to go to benghazi. what problem may emerge here, he went to benghazi with inadequate security. we have to understand that our embassies are not protected and our ambassadors are not protected by the marines or by u.s. personnel all the time. they're protected by the local government officials that provide that security. and chris was known as someone who didn't like the envelope of security around him. i think the real issue here is not so much whether or not the president or the administration was at fault, but whether or not the senior management level at the state department did not do their job adequately to make sure that chris was adequately protected going into a zone that was clearly -- all of us knew was dangerous from the get go. after all, the british ambassador had just come under attack in benghazi a month and a half before chris lost his life >> yes. how do americans separate the facts from politics though, mark, in these kinds of situations from either side
paul stevens administered the oath in the east room of the white house. tomorrow is the start of the new term of the supreme court and it's shaping up to be an important one for civil rights. toor more we turn to nbc news justice correspondent, pete williams. >> this supreme court term may be one of the most important in decades for civil rights. with the potential for blockbuster decisions on race and same-sex marriage. the court will examine the widespread practice of considering the race of students who apply for college. the case brought by a white high school senior, abigail fisher who said affirmative action kept her out of the university of texas. >> i always thought from the time i was a little girl that any kind of discrimination was wrong and for an institution of higher learning to act this way makes no sense to me. >> the university says it considers race as one factor in administrations to achieve a racially diverse campus. >> one of the greatest advantages of having a diverse student environment is it breaks down stereotypes and promotes cross-racial understandin
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)